Kit List: The Surly Pugsley

11602WP

Frame: Surly Pugsley; 1st generation purple, 18″

Fork: Surly, symmetrical 100mm spacing for generator hub, with bottle mounts

Handlebar: Surly 1×1 Torsion; 4130 Cro-Mo made by Nitto, 15deg sweep, 666mm wide

Stem: RaceFace Deus XC

Headset: Chris King NoThreadset

Brake Levers: Avid FR-5

Brakes: Avid BB7 with metallic pads; 203mm rotor (front), 160m rotor (rear)

Shifters: Shimano Ultegra bar-end levers to Velo Orange thumb-shifter mount

Front derailleur: Shimano Deore XT, e-type mount

Crank: FSA Alpha Drive; 44x32x22, 175mm

Bottom bracket: FSA Platinum, 100x148mm ISIS

Chainring: Surly 32T stainless steel

Pedals: Suntour XC-II platform

Rear derailleur:  Shimano Deore, SGS

Cassette: 8 speed 11-32, various

Chain: 8sp, usually SRAM

Front wheel: Shimano 3D72 generator hub for centerlock disc, to Surly Marge Lite rim with DT spokes

Rear wheel:  Shimano M475 hub to Surly Marge Lite rim with DT spokes

Tires: Surly Larry 26×3.8″, 120 tpi ultralight model

Tubes: 26×2.5-3.0″, for downhill with presta valve

Rim strips: Surly, for 65mm rim

Cables and housing: generic stainless, with Avid Rollamajig to rear derailleur

Sealant: TrueGoo, Stan’s

Grips: Velo Orange cork/foam blend

Water bottle cages: Profile Design Kage (2), Salsa Anything Cage, and generic cage on King Cage top cap mount

Pump: Lezyne Pressure Drive

Cyclecoputer (removed): Cateye Enduro

Lights: Supernova E3, front; B&M Toplight Line Plus, rear

158WP

Rack and fenders, modified: see here

Luggage: see here

11817WP

I’ll be long gone

Trying and trying to leave town, although I’ve put off making fenders and wiring my rear light for several days while I tend the lists I’ve scribbled onto the back of receipts and napkins.  Planning to be on the road for several months, a few extra days of preparation and planning will help to ensure a reliable bicycle and a smooth trip.  I’m planning to ride the Denali Park Road and the Denali Highway on my way out of the state.  The Park Road is a 90 mile dirt road into the heart of the park to the settlement of Kantishna.  Private motor vehicle traffic is extremely limited as most visitors are required to travel in Aramark-operated school buses, which reduce traffic volume to several dozen vehicles a day on the only road in the park.  The unpaved park road offers some of the best dirt road riding and scenery in the entire state, and free wilderness camping permits are issued to hikers and cyclists, who are required to hide their bikes from view of the road and make camp a short walk further.  It’s a highly regulated system, but it effectively preserves and simulates the kind of wilderness experience most visitors expect.

The Denali Highway, not to be confused with the Denali Park Road, is a 135 mile connector between the Parks Highway at Cantwell and the Richardson Highway in Paxson.  Most of the surrounding land is managed by the Bureau of Land Management, including several official campgrounds, which makes this another favorite Alaskan ride.  Before the (George) Parks Highway was built in 1971, the Denali Highway was the main automobile route to Mt McKinley National Park (since renamed Denali).  The Denali Highway was built as recently as 1957.

I have a short shopping list including a 1L drink bottle for my fuel, some scrap metal to complete a custom taillight bracket, and bear spray.  I’ve made a 4″ wide rear fender out of an $8 piece of aluminum from Lowe’s, some coruplast signage promoting Joe Miller’s Senate bid in 2010, and salvaged stays from a Planet Bike fender and an old chrome balloon tire fender.  In short supply of the proper tools, I managed to piece the whole thing together with the leather punch on my Swiss Army knife and a Park multitool.  The front fender will make for some conversation, as it features Joe Miller’s campaign slogan in four-inch tall lettering. It’s nice to have lights and fenders again.  The bike is finished, finally.  It’s ugly, and purple and excessively practical, but it’s done.

By now, I’m gone.

Boz Scagg’s song “I’ll Be Long Gone” is a classic from his eponymous 1969 Atlantic release.  The album was recorded in Muscle Shoals, AL with the usual cast of Swampers, and features Duane Allman on guitar.  Check out the guitar solo on “Loan Me a Dime”, from the same album.