In svelte attire; a ride revived

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I am always happy to see a bike given a new life. New bikes are a great option for some, but so many sit in garages, unused for years after purchase. Any bike, no matter the cost, is “worth it” if ridden, and enjoyed. However, repurposed old bikes sometimes manage to get the job done for less money, and with more style.

Returning to Tacoma uncovers a new breed of urban bike; of large-volume smooth tires, upright riding positions, racks and fenders. With money to burn, this may be a low-trail custom 650b urban/rando build. With more time than money, it is more likely to be an old steel mountain bike, rebuilt to suit. I found myself in an impromptu bike posse of new friends and acquaintances; in total, we were a Novara Aspen with drop bars, a Scott Boulder with steel three-speed bars and multi-colored cable housing, a Schwinn High Sierra, and an early-nineties Specialized Stumpjumper with a Velo Orange Milano handlebar featuring a comfortable 35 deg sweep. Fenders all around, rain boots and a bucket pannier– these kids are alright.

The old standard, and the gold standard, of practical urban commuters is built around the classic 700c touring frame. I was met with this refined Univega tourer/commuter, curated by my friend Josh, a luthier of fine guitars, and a craftsman of both fine and funky bicycles (including a home-made longtail, and an ATB-to-drop bar tourer conversion). Josh is a bike-commuting instrument repairman by day, and a gypsy-jazz guitarist by night. With updated accesories from Velo Orange, including: a Pass Hunter rack and decaleur, Campagne handlebar bag, fluted aluminum fenders and leather mudflap, and a VO stem and quill adaptor, this bike looks and rides like some of the finer handbuilt bicycles available. Two thousand dollar frames are outside of the price range of many committed enthusiasts, especially with a band of daughters to feed, such as Josh has. Sharing features of both the 1982 and 1983 Univega Gran Turismo, he suggests that this frame is a mid-year model– a 1982 1/2. Generous, although not gaping clearances and cantilever brakes allow suitably large tires and full-length fenders; while multiplicitous braze-ons allow various luggage permutations. A handlebar bag remains on the bike for a speedy, seven mile commute to work. Featuring a hub dynamo and lighting, year-yound commuting is possible in the insistantly overcast, and rainy conditons common to Tacoman winters. An old bike is reborn in svelte attire.

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Volunteering at 2nd Cycle on Saturday, two visitors to town– travelling kids– stopped in looking for bikes to take them to the southwest. Hanging from the wall, fully tuned and ready to ride was a Novara ATB (c. 1986-7), complete with fenders, a full complement of rack mounts, wide-range gearing, and durable 1.75″ tires. The rider had previously owned a “road bike”, likely an average ten-speed. With some trepidation, she allowed herself to be “sold” on upright riding and fat tires, at just over a hundred bucks. The fat-tired bike militia is growing.

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And then, some old bikes like the Gran Turismo and my High Sierra, simply ride better.

Note: I’m buying a used Pugsley this week. It is a first generation purple frame with rim brake mounts, no longer offered. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find 1982-3 Univega catalogs featuring the Gran Tursimo. I did find the 1983 line of Univega ATB’s, hilariously demonstrating their features and their off-the-charts fun factor.